Motivational Behaviour – Three Types – How to influence them

Being able to recognise what motivates people to action is a great skill for any leader, manager or sales person. Being able to recognise and pull the triggers that motivates an individual to action is the first step in being an effective leader. Being able to “communicate” on the same “wavelength” with the other party increases our chances of building rapport and increases our chances of having a motivated and productive relationship with others.

David McClelland through his work on human motivation, identified three primary motivational needs in Humans. He categorised these needs as follows;

  1. Need to Achieve (n Ach)
  2. Need of Authority/Influence or Power (n Pow)
  3. Need for Affiliation (n Afill)

How to recognise the behaviour types

McClelland stated that most people exhibit a combination of these three needs. However some people have a strong bias to one need and this impacts on their personal behaviour when interacting with others.

n Power

A person who has a high (n Pow) experiences high levels of motivation when they are in a position to exert influence or power over proceedings. A person with high (n Pow) exhibits the following behavioural characteristics.

  1. They like to take control.
  2. They want others to listen
  3. They take an active role in committees and organisational politics.
  4. They are firm and direct and are largely unconcerned  about others feelings.
  5. There is a strong need for their ideas to prevail over others.

n Achieve

A person who has a high (n Ach) seeks achievement wherever they can. Levels of motivation are at their highest when they can see an opportunity to achieve/make progress. A person with high (n Ach) exhibits the following personal characteristics.

  1. They like challenges and enjoy getting things done.
  2. They do not like close supervision.
  3. They like to set goals by which they and team are measured.
  4. They keep to time.
  5. They are interested in facts and figures.
  6. They are not overly friendly and may be perceived as cold and calculating.
  7. Can be sporty and like to measure progress against targets.

n Affiliation

Someone who has a high need for affiliation likes to work in situations where they can be seen to foster a supportive and caring environment bringing out the best in everyone. A person with a high (n Affil) exhibits the following personal characteristics.

  1. They enjoy the company of others – social animal.
  2. Will often talk about family and friends.
  3. They tend not to like silence.
  4. They look to find new ways of meeting and making friends.
  5. They seek approval and welcome feedback.
  6. Time is of lesser importance than the well-being of the team.
  7. They like to be held in high regard by others.
  8. Talks team and not I

Whether we are working in a leadership or sales capacity it is inevitable we will meet people whose  primary needs for motivation will differ. Clearly it makes sense for us to tap into the motivational needs of the other person if we are to improve our chances of having a successful and productive relationship. Here are some tips on how to flex our personal style to build and develop rapport with the three personality types already discussed.

How best to handle interactions with (n Power) types

  1. Find ways to let them believe any ideas was theirs – even if it was not.
  2. Provide them with options – they like to be seen to take decisions.
  3. Ask them for advice – they will love you for this.
  4. Do not put them in a position where they lose face.
  5. Introduce them to other “important players”
  6. Acknowledge their status. (Mr Captain, Mr Chairman, Sir Etc)

How best to handle interactions with (n Achieve) types

  1. Talk facts and figures
  2. Keep to time
  3. Be factual
  4. Provide a challenge
  5. Show how they can be number one.
  6. Focus on the task more than the relationship
  7. Avoid time-wasting and ambiguity
  8. Provide ongoing reports on progress
  9. Focus on results
  10. Do not miss a commitment

How best to handle interactions with (n Affiliation) types

  1. Keep it simple
  2. Focus on the relationship. Smile
  3. Be interested in non work related communication
  4. Remember names and events
  5. Show how your ideas or suggestions improve team work and co-ordination
  6. Talk about team and not I
  7. Introduce to other affiliators

Not sure which type you are?

If you often hear your self say;

Nobody seems to listen around here!

I wonder what Jimmy is doing right now?

No one seems to be giving me the recognition I deserve!

suggests you are probably a (n Pow) type.

If you often hear your self say;

If only others would put in the effort

I am fed up with others missing deadlines

Why don’t they just enjoy work and get on with it!

People round here lack focus

It is likely that you are a (n Ach) type

If you often hear your self say;

We need to get the team working more effectively

There is insufficient communication taking place

Why does no one want to go for a beer after work?

this suggests that your primary motivation is (n Affil) type.

Handling Failure and Rejection

Handling failure and rejection is a fact of life especially if you are in sales, management or a budding entrepreneur. How one reacts to failure or rejection directly affects ones self-esteem and ongoing levels of motivation.

I think that failure and rejection are two different things that are interlinked in the mind of each and everyone. I have worked with numerous individuals over the years and some handle failure and rejection really well and others can hit the self destruct button. Having the correct mindset is essential to overcoming setbacks. The fear of failure and or rejection can be debilitating or liberating!

The first thing to consider is

There is no success without first trying. Failure is part of the journey to success.

Failure

Trying means you are bound to experience failure at some point or another. I have yet to meet anyone who claims to be successful all of the time. If you want success then you have to be prepared to encounter failure. Most successful people know this. How many of us learned to ride a bike without crashing once or twice? It hurts but you simply get back on and try again. If at first you don’t succeed try, try and try again!

Rejection

Rejection on the other hand is when an individual senses emotional pain to the extent that their own personality or capabilities are brought into question by themselves.

  • Why do they not like me?
  • What have I done wrong for them not to accept me?
  • Why am I so inadequate?

Try to remember when you are feeling rejection this may not be a reflection on you. It could be that the other person simply is not on your wavelength.

There is no simple answer on how to handle rejection.

This depends on your own personality and make-up. However having observed successful people at first hand,  they have all experienced rejection at one time and another. However what sets them apart is they find a way to move forward that suits their personality and sense of direction and purpose at that time.They always find a way to bounce back!

Here are a few suggestions I hope you might find useful on handling rejection.

  • Try not to take it personally.
  • Do not give up at the first sign of difficulty.
  • Accept that you are more likely to fail than succeed.
  • Learn to love yourself and others will follow.

Success usually tastes sweeter when you have experienced failure/rejection first.

After all how do you know what success is if you have not experienced failure?

If fear of failure or rejection is holding you back, I would recommend reading the book “Feel the fear and do it anyway” by Susan Jeffers.

Best wishes.